144 – An Unorthodox View of Atoms

Even with our advanced evolutionary progress it has been very difficult for our brains to incorporate the fact that atoms are our most basic component elements; as we have, for instance, incorporated the fact that the earth orbits the sun and not as otherwise appears to our senses, or as we have begun to incorporate … with reticence … the fact that our ancestry is simian and that homo sapiens came out of black Africa.

 Atoms, as immense as our Universe is and so far as we know, congregate into mere 118 elements (see periodic table below), with some of those elements forming chemical compounds such as molecules which, in us, organize into cells, which then organize into hearts, brains, bone, blood, and in unison, create the experience we call Mind, Soul, Inner Force, Energy, Spirit. The capacity of a relatively small amount of elements to congregate with immensurable creativity into myriad manifestations of existence, is undoubtedly inherited from a primordial blueprint that blankets everything created within our Universe … from the most basic elements, to stars and galaxies … with the universal mandate to Self-organize, Self-generate, Bond, Adapt, Self-perpetuate, Transform.

periodic-table

 

Incapable of perceiving with our limited organic senses the self-determination of this universal mandate in atoms, we currently think of them as mechanical, purposeless structures with one or more electrons bound to a nucleus by a ‘magnetic’ force, yet void of the intelligence required to self-organize and bond with increasing complexity. How then to account for the fact that in such an immense Universe as ours, atoms have grouped into mere 118 elements, which makes their astonishing capacity to self-organize in an evolving Universe plainly obvious; how to account for the fact that some of the combinations atoms create as they bond and separate (isotopes, nuclides*) can be as ancient as to be present since the birth of our solar system, which makes it obvious that their architecture can be perpetuated with unimaginable self-determination for billions of years amid an evolving Universe; or how to account for the fact that their ability to associate and dissociate, in affinity with changing environments, is responsible for most of the creativity observed in Nature.

If atoms behave with such a degree of self-determination, if they self-organize with such a creative and dramatically concise order, if they are so adaptable as to being able to congregate with ingenuity and cohesion into myriad self-generating forms, if they are bound, as each one of us is, by the same universal mandate that has given us our intelligence … Self-organize, Self-generate, Bond, Adapt, Self-perpetuate, Transform … there is no way to negate their intelligence.

“Astonishing! Everything is intelligent.” Pythagoras

As Andre Gide once said “All this has been said before – but since nobody listened, it must be said again.”

Anaxagoras:

“In everything there is a share of everything.”

Pythagoras:

“Know thyself and thou will know the Universe.” “Thou shall likewise know that according to Law, the nature of the Universe is in all things.”

“Astonishing! Everything is intelligent.”

Aristotle:

“For the eyes of bats are to the blaze of day, so is the reason in our soul to the things which are by nature most evident of all.”

A World Made by Atoms by Margarete Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle:

Small atoms of themselves a world may make,/For being subtle, every shape they take;/And as they dance about, they places find,/Of forms, that best agree, make every kind./For when we build a house of brick, or stone,/We lay them even, every one by one:/And when we find a gap that’s big, or small,/We seek out stones to fit that place withal./For when as they too big, or little be,/They fall away, and cannot stay, we see./So atoms, as they dance, find places fit,/And there remaining close and fast will knit./Those which not fit, the rest that rove about,/Do never leave, until they thrust them out./Thus by their forms and motions they will be,/Like workmen, which amongst themselves agree;/And so, by chance, may a new world create:/Or else predestinate, may work by fate.

Atoms of the same elements have the same number of protons, called the atomic number: for example, all copper atoms contain 29 protons. Within a single element the number of neutrons may vary, determining the isotope of that element: for example, all hydrogen atoms admit exactly one proton, but isotopes exist with no neutron (hydrogen-1 is by far the most common form). The total number of protons and neutrons determine the nuclide. Wikipedia

Note: New posts are usually published on the 1st and 15th of the month. To subscribe to the blog click on the RSS feeder (orange icon) on the left column of the Home page down below the Archives

Be Sociable, Share!

Leave a Reply